FMP – G.F Smith Paper Choices/Research & Swatch Book

One of my design considerations was to choose the material on which to print my book onto. I’ve attended two lectures in the past couple of years from G.F. Smith, who provide interesting and quality papers to the design industry. They gave us samples of particular papers, demonstrating how they can be used to the best of their abilities. I looked back at these samples and reminded myself. I also examined the G.F. Smith swatch book, which allowed me to feel the paper in different weights, and explore a wide variety of options.

I refined my choices to two paper stocks:

  • Heaven 42 – A “blue” shade of white. Originally designed for a luxury car company, Heaven 42 was designed to lift metallic objects of the paper.
  • Strathmore – Almost like cartridge paper, I really liked how the feel can change dramatically from the choice of paper stock. In contrast to Heaven 42, the shade of the paper is slightly duller. This may mean my vibrant colours may be lost slightly in the darker paper, and the ink looks to seep into the paper more.

In conclusion, I think my book would benefit from a clean feel to it. From previous experience working with isolated food product images, I often add a blue tint to the white background to get a purer white. This lifts the vibrant colours of the fresh food from the background, as opposed to a yellow shade which would imply dirtiness.

 

20170508_113200

 

 

FMP – Disintegration Effect Photoshop

One effect I’ve always been fascinated with is disintegration of an isolated subject. My title for my book is “Food For Thought” and I feel this gives me scope to use my creativity on the front cover of the book. The idea I want to get across to my audience is thinking about the food we eat. I feel the disintegration effects signifies the digestion process of the food, whilst also being dynamic as a piece of art.

I selected an image of a strawberry, attempting to symbolise healthy eating.Screenshot 2017-05-08 15.41.57

I created a new layer, and made a selection around the whole strawberry, without the shadow. I saved the path but kept the selection, and cut the strawberry onto a new layer. I filled the selection with white. Using the paint brush tool I then painted everything other than the shadow pure white, then selected the image, copied it, and pasted it onto an alpha channel. I created a fresh new layer and loaded the selection, and finally filled it white black.

Screenshot 2017-05-08 15.42.20

I created a new layer with the cut strawberry, and used the used the liquify tool to stretch the colours out, giving me space to create the disintegration effect. I created a layer mask, filling it with black to hide it for the moment..

Screenshot 2017-05-08 15.42.46

On another cut strawberry layer, I started to use scatter brushes to “chop” into the strawberry, which will allow space for the effect to show.

Screenshot 2017-05-08 15.44.10

On the liquified layer, I used more scatter brushes to reveal more of the layer mask.Screenshot 2017-05-08 15.44.22

The Final Pieces..

Screenshot 2017-05-08 15.44.26.png

FOOD4THOUGHT_BOOK_01

 

World Of Tanks – Ideas & Sketches

To quickly visualise my ideas, I sketched out ideas in my sketch book to implement “Intelligent Fast Failure”. It also meant that I didn’t have to mock it up digitally, which would take a lot of time, and seeing as this is a short project, the ideas are key.

I started by looking at a narrative to run alongside the game, which will engage the reader, tapping into the human emotions of war. I also kept looking back at my research the gather ideas on layout and design.

One of my strongest ideas was to focus on a civilian angle, looking at how the destruction of war effects the local people. The idea was as you scroll down the page, the civilians rise up as their own clan and chase the other clans away.

wp-1488890374631.jpgwp-1488890381088.jpgwp-1488890387799.jpg

G.F Smith

It was great to have G.F Smith come in as a guest speaker to talk about all things paper! It’s a fundamental part of design, and something I have great interest in.

They handed us loads of different samples explaining how and why they were designed as sheets, and what reaction each material has with ink. They also supplied small printed books which illustrated different printing techniques and finishes, with a key on each page telling you exactly what has been used in the makeup of the design.

One of the most interesting sheets of paper he spoke about in my opinion, was “heaven 42”, a ultra white sheet of paper. To demonstrate, the paper consultant held up a standard sheet of a4 plain paper. The difference was quite dramatic. The consultant outlined the history, mentioning it was originally produced for a well known luxury car brand. They wanted a white sheet that had a very slight tint of blue. They thought that this would make metallic and shiny images to pop right out of the page. I have to agree, the printed results were incredible! The carmaker however didn’t retain the license for long, so the printed advantage wasn’t for very long as other producers began to print their catalogues on Heaven 42.

I also learnt the difference between coated and uncoated papers, and how the ink reacts to different fibres and weights of paper. G.F Smith are the luxury end of the market, and a lot of their sheets are very adaptable in terms of the printer used. However it was still great to hear local knowledge of printers around, and having dialogue about what type of printer will deliver the best results, for example digital vs litho.

Thumbnail Sketches Of Memorials

As part on my development I sat down and sketched out some ideas for my memorial. This helped me visualise my ideas and plan around with what type I would position where.

I wanted the design to signify my life, and my interests. My ideas included a cup and a football, which shows my interest in sport. This links in with the quote that lies below my name, “A fun, loving, creative man with a passion for all things sport.

The sketches also helped me understand which elements should be exaggerated to be clear on the gravestone. There should be a clear hierarchy of importance in the text elements and hope to achieve this with my typeface choices, weights such as light, regular, bold, and black, and scale.

 

Scan 3.jpeg

Further Development of Front Cover

Creative Review_v2_Print3

After finishing my first front cover design, I looked at it and picked it apart using pmi, identifying what worked well in the design and what I could do to improve it.

Overall I was quite happy with the design, however I thought it looked quite flat and the signifiers might not portray the subculture in the right light. With this in mind, I had a think about what being a mod was all about. I identified that moral panic between mods and rockers was something that was quite prominent in mod subculture.  I went back to the drawing board and looked at how I could get the sense of panic in the design, whilst retaining the signifiers arranged in a different way.

I took the black daisy out as I think this flat shape makes the design look 2 dimensional and lacking depth. To add depth, I sourced an image of an article from the 60’s showing medias portrayal of both the mods and rockers to the public. I felt this gave that busy, hectic, panic feeling to the reader, whilst still relating to the brief and the style of Creative Review.

I also extruded the Lambretta logo at a 45 degree angle, bleeding off the page and adding depth to the design. I wanted to make the bikes look like they were coming out of the extruded Lambretta logo, showing almost like a transporter effect from past to present, signifying a revival amongst mods.

Creative Review_v2.jpg